Friday, January 7, 2011

Overheard: Governance link highlights (Jan. 7)

Today, I’m launching what I hope will be a weekly event, an “Overheard” post highlighting governance-related links and resources that may be of interest to readers of this blog.


Thought provoking and informative, they come from my RSS feed, my Twitter stream and my Facebook wall. Usually, I will share links discovered earlier in the week. This time, I’m reaching back to the holiday break.


I offer them in the spirit of passing on a tiny fraction of the wisdom that generous and smart folks share willingly and widely. Feel free to forward anything that intrigues you to your favorite nonprofit board.


New Year’s Resolutions for Board Members (Gail Perry)


In the spirit of the new year and the fresh start it implies, Gail offers her basic list of potential high-impact actions and focus areas for nonprofit boards. Rich and important governance discussion is inevitable.


Focusing Your Board on Sustainability (Kevin Monroe)


Kevin built his post around three end-of-the-year questions for boards to ponder. One of the things I appreciate most about his contribution is its focus of boards on a critical responsibility of governance: organizational sustainability. Too often, boards focus on the here and now, and on tasks that are not governance focus areas.


The Role of Non-Executive Board Directors Today (Lucy Marcus)


If you read this blog regularly, you’re already familiar with Lucy’s work (and my admiration for her). As with most of her writing, this is blog post does not address nonprofit governance specifically; but her key points apply directly to governance within the sector. Pay particularly close attention to points two (boundary spanning/community engagement) and three (asking hard questions).


Nine Keys for Reinvigorating Board Leadership (IdeaEncore)


IdeaEncore provides access to one of my favorite tools for sharing with boards. This TCC Group thought piece, available for online reading or download (with free registration), has sparked many productive conversations with boards, usually in a retreat setting.

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